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Northern Arizona Habitat Restoration and Wildfire Risk Reduction

The Northern Arizona Habitat Restoration and Wildfire Risk Reduction Partnership Project would mechanically treat woody species, implement prescribed burning, develop new wildlife watering facilities, and develop education and outreach to improve habitat for large game and grassland obligate species, reduce fire risk to rural communities and Grand Canyon National Park, promote groundwater recharge, and build community understanding of and support for grassland restoration activities.

Across the West, historical grasslands have been encroached by woody species. This encroachment has fragmented habitat, reduced forage availability and hiding cover, increased hazardous fuels and wildfire risk, increased erosion, reduced groundwater recharge, and reduced moisture availability for non-woody species.

The Northern Arizona Habitat Restoration and Wildfire Risk Reduction Partnership Project would mechanically treat woody species, implement prescribed burning, develop new wildlife watering facilities, and develop education and outreach to improve habitat for large game and grassland obligate species, reduce fire risk to rural communities and Grand Canyon National Park, promote groundwater recharge, and build community understanding of and support for grassland restoration activities.

The project area is 1,570,000 acres and spans the Williams and Tusayan Ranger Districts of the Kaibab National Forest (KNF) and surrounding state and private lands in north-central Arizona.

The project area is south of and adjacent to Grand Canyon National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Vegetation types include grasslands, shrublands, pinyon-juniper woodlands, and ponderosa pine. Benefits to communities would include reduced risk of uncharacteristic wildfire, improved conditions for local producers, fuelwood availability, increased recreation opportunities for hunting and wildlife viewing, volunteerism, and contract offerings for small businesses.

The project would also support existing and promote new partnerships.

Partners: Arizona Game and Fish Department, Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management, Arizona Elk Society, Mule Deer Foundation, Arizona Antelope Foundation, and the Coconino Natural Resource Conservation District

  • FY 2022
  • FY 2022 Joint Chiefs' Landscape Restoration Project
  • Total FY22 Funding Request: $1,265,473
Arizona: Kaibab National Forest; Coconino and Yavapai counties
Filed under: Wildland Fire, Research